• Cambridge Literature Coursebook

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  • Cambridge Literature Syllabus

    Cambridge Literature - Syllabus

    Class information:

    Teacher: Mr. Ryan Thornburg

    Room: 110

    Subject: Honors English

    Teacher phone: 696-5552

    Teacher email: rthornburg@amphi.com

    Teacher website: https://www.amphi.com/Domain/4108 & https://sites.google.com/view/thornburgwebsite/

    Overview of the class:

    Cambridge Literature (Cambridge Syllabus 0427) is an advanced course for sophomores at Amphitheater High School. The course is intended to give high achieving sophomores a more enriching experience so that they may develop further as learners.

                Cambridge’s statement:

    Cambridge Assessment International Education prepares school students for life, helping them develop an informed curiosity and a lasting passion for learning. We are part of the University of Cambridge.

    Our international qualifications are recognized by the world’s best universities and employers, giving students a wide range of options in their education and career. As a not-for-profit organization, we devote our resources to delivering high-quality educational programs that can unlock learners’ potential.

    Our programs and qualifications set the global standard for international education. They are created by subject experts, rooted in academic rigor, and reflect the latest educational research. They provide a strong platform for learners to progress from one stage to the next, and are well supported by teaching and learning resources.

    Our mission is to provide educational benefit through provision of international programs and qualifications for school education and to be the world leader in this field. Together with schools, we develop Cambridge learners who are confident, responsible, reflective, innovative, and engaged – equipped for success in the modern world.

    Every year, nearly a million Cambridge students from 10,000 schools in 160 countries prepare for their future with an international education from Cambridge International.

                Advantages of the Cambridge Curriculum:

    The Cambridge curriculum is equivalent to an on-level high school curriculum. Students who take at least seven (7) Cambridge courses and successfully pass the associated seven (7) Cambridge exams

               


     

    Assessment objectives:

    AO

    Skill

    Mark / Level

    Description

    1

    Using quotes to show comprehension of the text

    8 - high

    Demonstrates knowledge by incorporating well-selected reference to the text skillfully and with flair

     

     

    6

    demonstrates knowledge by supporting with careful and relevant reference to the text

     

     

    4

    demonstrates knowledge by using some supporting textual detail

     

     

    1 - low

    demonstrates knowledge by limited textual reference

     

    2

    Show understanding of text via connections or relations to theme / sources / real-world application

    8 / 7

    sustains a critical understanding of the text showing individuality and insight / shows a clear critical understanding of the text

     

     

    6

    shows a clear understanding of the text and some of its deeper implications

     

     

    4

    shows some understanding of meaning

     

     

     

    1

    shows some limited understanding of simple/literal meaning

     

    3

    Show understanding of writer effects

    8

    responds sensitively and in considerable detail to the way the writer achieves her/his effects

     

     

    6

    makes a developed response to the way the writer achieves her/his effects

     

     

    4

    makes a little reference to the language of the text

     

     

     

    1

    shows a little awareness of surface meaning of text and language

     

    4

    Overall writing ability and ability to keep essay related to the prompt

    8 / 7

    sustains personal and evaluative engagement with task and text / sustains a perceptive, convincing, and relevant personal response

     

     

    6

    makes a well-developed, detailed, and relevant personal response

     

     

    5/ 4

    makes a reasonably developed relevant personal response / begins to develop a relevant personal response

     

     

    1

    makes a limited attempt to respond

     

     

     

     

    Grading:

    Practice activities:

    0 or 1 or 2 points in the gradebook

    0 for not starting at all; 1 point for starting it and not completing it; 2 points for completing the practice

    Mastery checks:

    Out of 12 points / 2 = up to 4 points in the gradebook

    0 for not starting; the mastery check will be graded on a 12 point rubric and then divided by 3 to get to a grade within the ranges of 1 to 4, most likely resulting in a grade with a decimal point

    Rubric for mastery checks:

    Assessment objectives

    Not Good

    Good

    Mastered

    AO1- Using quotes to show comprehension of the text

    Reference the text without actually citing the text

    Cite the text with quotes

    Cite the text with quotes that match up with the claims in the essay

    AO2- Show a deeper understanding of text

    Mention non-literal meanings of the text’s words

    Connect the text with real world issues

    Critique the text on social, economic, racial or other issues appropriate to the text with personal insight

    AO3- Show understanding of writer effects

    Reference the language the writer uses

    Adequately explain how the writer creates effects or how the reader responds to those effects

    Sufficiently explain in detail how the writer creates effects in the writing and how readers respond to those effects

    AO4- Writing ability and ability to keep essay related to the prompt

    Either bad grammar or strayed too far from the prompt or response is not in an essay format

    Appropriate grammar throughout and may stray explanations from the scope of the prompt

    Appropriate grammar throughout and keeping all explanations within the scope of the prompt

     

                Mastery reflections:

    0 or 1 point in the gradebook

    0 for not starting; 1 point for completing the mastery reflection

    Coursework essays:

    Out of 25 marks /5 = up to 5 points in the gradebook

    Rubric is provided and follow the same mastery guidelines as the mastery checks

    Final Projects:

    Out of 20 points /4 = up to 5 points in the gradebook

    Rubric will be provided and follows a similar mastery guideline as the mastery checks

    Final grades per semester:

    A point calculation will decide percentage of grade for the semester in which:

    90-100% of points gained from points possible = A

    80-89% of points gained from points possible = B

    70-79% of points gained from points possible = C

    60-69% of points gained from points possible = D

    50% or less of points gained from points possible = F

                Mastery grades:

    The grading teacher may add points to the overall grade to reflect improvement from the mastery checks to subsequent mastery checks, or to reflect improvements from a coursework essay to subsequent coursework essays, or both.

    The grading teacher may also grade the student based on the student’s mastery of the four (4) assessment objective; whichever grades ends up being a higher letter grade should be used in the gradebook.

    Mastery of all four (4) AOs = A

    Mastery of three (3) AOs = B

    Mastery of two (2) AOs = C

    Mastery of one (1) AO = D

    Mastery of none (0) AOs = F

     

    Classroom Expectations

    Punctuality: Students should be in their seats by the time the bell rings

    Preparedness: Students should have all materials out and ready by the time the bell rings

    Respect: Students should respect peers, peer property, school property, and the teacher at all times

    Participation: Students should actively participate in class, including listening, writing, and discussion based activities.


     

    Assignments:

    Practice activities:

    Through the first week of each quarter, students will be shown activities available for them to use when reading texts. After the first week of each quarter, a reading list and timeframe will be given to students and the remaining time in the quarter will be devoted to practicing activities aligned with mastery guidelines and goals. Practice activities will be performed on texts in the provided coursebook. No outside texts will be allowed for the practice activities.

    Each student must produce at least four (4) but no more than eight (8) practice activities before attempting a mastery check. A student may produce up to 2 practice activities per text and cannot repeat the same practice activity for 2 texts in a row.

    Practice activities include:

    TPCASTT charts; T-charts; pictures with quotes; figurative language work; writing and quote usage; summaries; character charts; theme charts; theme explanations; motives chart; writer research; loaded language; connections and relations explanations; and more

    Mastery checks:

    Once a student has met their practice activity goals, they must attempt a mastery check. A mastery check will consist of an essay or essay equivalent to prove that the student has mastered the assessment objectives. A student may complete a mastery reflection for each mastery check to gain extra credit for the class.

    Each student must complete at least three (3) mastery checks during each of the first three (3) units: poetry, prose, and drama.

    The intention for mastery checks is for students to see their progress towards mastery of each assessment objective and to prepare for each coursework essay.

    Coursework essays:

    During the last week of each unit, students will write 1 of 3 coursework essays as a staple assessment for the course. Coursework essays are a culmination of mastery of a particular type of text – poetry, prose, and drama. Students must show mastery in all assessment objectives at the same time, in the same assignment. It is possible to show mastery of an AO during a mastery check and fail to show mastery during the coursework essay on the same AO. In these instances, students will not be able to substitute their mastery grade into the coursework essay as it is understood that showing mastery of all AOs at the same time is more difficult.

    There are three coursework essays. Each one follows the unit of type of text the class finished studying. Poetry is studied first and so Coursework 1 is on poetry, specifically on two analogous poems by the same poet. Prose is studied second so Coursework 2 is on prose, specifically on two chosen short stories from the coursebook, or from the selected book form the prose unit. Drama is studied last and so Coursework 3 is on drama, specifically on a Shakespeare text provided in the coursebook.


     

    Submitting assignments:

    All practice activities must follow the submission format to be collected by the teacher. The submission format serves multiple purposes such as: 1) ensuring that the student and teacher know which assignment type and text the submission is associated with 2) to ensure that the same type of assignment cannot be repeated on the next text.

    Submission format:

    Students will need to follow this format – At the top of the page (white space) include the following information:

    Name; title of text; name of practice activity; assessment object (AO) being practiced.

    Students may submit multiple practice activities on the same piece of paper if they are all on the same text and if the name of practice activity and the AO being practiced are present for all practice activities.

    Plagiarism:

    Amphi’s plagiarism policy:

    Academic integrity, scholastic honesty, is essential for the assessment of student learning and the evaluation of teaching practices.  We educators need to know what a particular student and a particular class have learned and the extent to which our curriculum and instruction is sound.  Academic dishonesty is an obstacle to this intent.  Academic integrity is violated when a student obtains credit for, or is evaluated on, work that is not his or her own. 

    The two most common forms of academic dishonesty that we encounter in the classroom are cheating and plagiarism.  Every student must be informed by both the school and the individual teacher as to what constitutes academic dishonesty and the consequences of such.  When cheating or plagiarism occurs, it is important that the incident be recorded, appropriate school staff and the student's parents be notified, and a grade of F or zero be assigned.  Depending on the seriousness of the offense, punishment could range from zero for that particular piece of student's work, to F for the entire course, or an administrative office referral.

    Cambridge’s plagiarism policy:

    Candidates should be made aware of the academic conventions governing quotation and reference to the work of others and taught to use them. This should include full reference to the publication, including date, author, and page number. If it is a website, the website address and the date the website was accessed should be included.

    Contacting the Teacher

    Students who wish to contact the teacher with concerns or questions about course content can email the teacher at the listed email address. Students may also make an appointment to meet with the teacher before or after school by filling out an appointment request form found in class.


     

    Projected schedule:

    Quarter 1 – start of semester 1

    Week

    Assignments

    1

    Review AO’s, rubrics, and activities for the year

    Review poetry, writing essays

    Set goals for producing work in class to meet mastery goals

    2

    As a class, produce at least 2 activities on the same poetry text, review alternate activities

    3

     

    Work time to produce 16-24 practice activities and subsequent mastery checks with reflections

     

    Writing workshops: literary analysis essay structure / claims and thesis /paragraphs

     

    4

    5

    6

    7

    8

    Coursework 1

    Quarter 2

    Week

    Assignments

    1

    As a class, produce at least 2 activities on the same prose text, review alternate activities

    2

     

    Work time to produce 16-24 practice activities and subsequent mastery checks with reflections

     

    Writing workshops: using quotes / connecting evidence / grammar

    3

    4

    5

    6

    7

    Coursework 2

    8 – Finals

    End of semester speech

    Quarter 3 – start of semester 2

    Week

    Assignments

    1

    As a class, produce at least 2 activities on the same drama text, review alternate activities

    Review goals and mastery from semester 1 / Set new or updated goals for semester 2

    2

     

    Work time to produce 16-24 practice activities and subsequent mastery checks with reflections

     

    Writing workshops: appropriate personality / transitions and flow

    3

    4

    5

    6

    7

    8

    Coursework 3

    Quarter 4

    Week

    Assignments

    1

    Review all Coursework essays and revise for Coursework portfolios

    2

    Vocabulary projects and presentations

    3

     

    Review missed texts from the year – individual study projects and presentations

    4

    5

    6

    Final projects on a text from earlier in the year

    7

    8 – Finals

    Final project presentation

    Review goals and mastery from semester 2 and the year

     

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