• What does Speech @ Prince look like?

    Students who receive speech/language support have been identified through a series of observations and assessments as demonstrating a communication disorder. A communication disorder a term to describe a number of different challenges including: articulation (how we say our sounds), fluency (stuttering – how smoothly we are able to share our thoughts), expressive language (how well we are able to organize our thoughts into words – grammar, vocabulary, etc.), receptive language (how well we are able to understand what we’re being told – grammar, vocabulary, etc.), and social/pragmatic language (how well we are able to use our language skills to interact with people and our environment). Our students may only need to work on 1 area or multiple areas. Specific goals are tailored to the needs of each student and will be discussed in-depth at your student’s IEP meeting.

     

    While we're DISTANCE LEARNING:

    To support our students who have a communication disorder, speech services will occur via Zoom with additional handouts/packets sent home as needed. I will be working with your student's teacher(s) to coordinate a time during their day, very similar to when they were/are in school, for them to jump into the "Speech Zoom Room," to receive speech/language support per their current IEP. A link will be placed in your student's Seesaw (K-1) or Google Classroom (2-5) accounts to easily access our sessions.

     

    When we're all back IN SCHOOL:

    To support our students who have a communication disorder, speech services may occur in one or a combination of the following methods while in-person once we're all back to school. Because of this, a combination of service models is often used throughout the school year. However, these options are always discussed in-depth at your student’s IEP meeting.

    • Pull–out services in small groups: Students are taken out of their class for a short period of time (anywhere from 20–30 minutes/session) to come to the Speech Room with peers to practice their communication goal(s). Students benefit from group sessions as it gives them an opportunity to not only work on their specific goals, but also practice with peers, and learn to generalize their new skills. Working with peers can also help students improve their own listening skills as well as good citizenship skills in learning to support their peers.
      • It should also be noted that for students who receive articulation–only (usually only 1 –2 sounds) therapy, may sometimes benefit from shorter more frequent sessions, often occurring right outside the classroom door.

     

    • Pull–out services in individual sessions: A student is taken out of his/her class for a short period of time (anywhere from 20 – 30 minutes/session) to practice their communication goal(s) in a 1–on–1 setting with the SLP. This service model is often reserved for reevaluation testing, when students may require additional practice with their goal(s), or have a specific need that cannot be met during group sessions.

     

    • Push–in services: This service model occurs when the Speech Teacher works with his/her student(s) in their classroom. This gives the students the opportunity to practice their communication goal(s) in the classroom setting.