• Appendix A
    Library Bill of Rights
    The American Library Association affirms that all libraries are forums for information and ideas, and that the following basic policies should guide their services.
    I. Books and other library resources should be provided forThe interest, information, and enlightenment of all peopleof the community the library serves. Materials should notbe excluded because of the origin, background, or viewsof those contributing to their creation.
    II. Libraries should provide materials and informationpresenting all points of view on current and historicalissues. Materials should not be proscribed or removedbecause of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.
    III. Libraries should challenge censorship in the fulfillment oftheir responsibility to provide information andenlightenment.
    IV. Libraries should cooperate with all persons and groupsconcerned with resisting abridgment of free expressionand free access to ideas.
    V. A person's right to use a library should not be denied orabridged because of origin, age, background, or views.
    VI. Libraries which make exhibit spaces and meeting roomsavailable to the public they serve should make suchfacilities available on an equitable basis, regardless of thebeliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups requestingtheir use.
    Adopted June 18, 1948.
    Amended February 2, 1961, and January 23, 1980,
    inclusion of "age" reaffirmed January 23, 1996,
    by the ALA Council.
    Appendix B
    THE FREEDOM TO READ

    The freedom to read is essential to our democracy. It is continuously under attack.Private groups and public authorities in various parts of the country are working to remove or limit access to reading materials, to censor content in schools, to label"controversial" views, to distribute lists of "objectionable" books or authors, andto purge libraries. These actions apparently rise from a view that our nationaltradition of free expression is no longer valid; that censorship and suppression areneeded to avoid the subversion of politics and the corruption of morals. We, ascitizens devoted to reading and as librarians and publishers responsible for disseminating ideas, wish to assert the public interest in the preservation of the freedom to read.

    Most attempts at suppression rest on a denial of the fundamental premise of democracy: that the ordinary citizen, by exercising critical judgment, will accept the good and reject the bad. The censors, public and private, assume that they should determine what is good and what is bad for their fellow citizens.

    We trust Americans to recognize propaganda and misinformation, and to make their own decisions about what they read and believe. We do not believe they need the help of censors to assist them in this task. We do not believe they are prepared to sacrifice their heritage of a free press in order to be "protected" against what others think may be bad for them. We believe they still favor free enterprise in ideas and expression.

    These efforts at suppression are related to a larger pattern of pressures being brought against education, the press, art and images, films, broadcast media, and the Internet. The problem is not only one of actual censorship. The shadow of fear cast by these pressures leads, we suspect, to an even larger voluntary curtailment of expression by those who seek to avoid controversy.

    Such pressure toward conformity is perhaps natural to a time of accelerated change. And yet suppression is never more dangerous than in such a time of social tension. Freedom has given the United States the elasticity to endure strain. Freedom keeps open the path of novel and creative solutions, and enables change to come by choice. Every silencing of a heresy, every enforcement of an orthodoxy, diminishes the toughness and resilience of our society and leaves it the less able to deal with controversy and difference.

    Now as always in our history, reading is among our greatest freedoms. Thefreedom to read and write is almost the only means for making generally availableideas or manners of expression that can initially command only a small audience.The written word is the natural medium for the new idea and the untried voicefrom which come the original contributions to social growth. It is essential to theextended discussion that serious thought requires, and to the accumulation ofknowledge and ideas into organized collections.

    We believe that free communication is essential to the preservation of a freesociety and a creative culture. We believe that these pressures toward conformitypresent the danger of limiting the range and variety of inquiry and expression onwhich our democracy and our culture depend. We believe that every Americancommunity must jealously guard the freedom to publish and to circulate, in orderto preserve its own freedom to read. We believe that publishers and librarianshave a profound responsibility to give validity to that freedom to read by making itpossible for the readers to choose freely from a variety of offerings. The freedomto read is guaranteed by the Constitution. Those with faith in free people will standfirm on these constitutional guarantees of essential rights and will exercise theresponsibilities that accompany these rights.

    We therefore affirm these propositions:
    1. It is in the public interest for publishers and librarians to make available the widest diversity of views and expressions, including those that are unorthodox or unpopular with the majority.

    Creative thought is by definition new, and what is new is different. The bearer of every new thought is a rebel until that idea is refined and tested. Totalitarian systems attempt to maintain themselves in power by the ruthless suppression of any concept that challenges the established orthodoxy. The power of a democratic system to adapt to change is vastly strengthened by the freedom of its citizens to choose widely from among conflicting opinions offered freely to them. To stifle every nonconformist idea at birth would mark the end of the democratic process. Furthermore, only through the constant activity of weighing and selecting can the democratic mind attain the strength demanded by times like these. We need to know not only what we believe but why we believe it.

    2. Publishers, librarians, and booksellers do not need to endorse every idea or presentation they make available. It would conflict with the public interest for them to establish their own political, moral, or aesthetic views as a standard for determining what should be published or circulated.

    Publishers and librarians serve the educational process by helping to make available knowledge and ideas required for the growth of the mind and the increase of learning. They do not foster education by imposing as mentors the patterns of their own thought. The people should have the freedom to read and consider a broader range of ideas than those that may be held by any single librarian or publisher or government or church. It is wrong that what one can read should be confined to what another thinks proper.

    3. It is contrary to the public interest for publishers or librarians to bar access to writings on the basis of the personal history or political affiliations of the author.

    No art or literature can flourish if it is to be measured by the political views or private lives of its creators. No society of free people can flourish that draws up lists of writers to whom it will not listen, whatever they may have to say.

    4. There is no place in our society for efforts to coerce the taste of others, to confine adults to the reading matter deemed suitable for adolescents, or to inhibit the efforts of writers to achieve artistic expression.

    To some, much of modern expression is shocking. But is not much of life itself shocking? We cut off literature at the source if we prevent writers from dealing with the stuff of life. Parents and teachers have a responsibility to prepare the young to meet the diversity of experiences in life to which they will be exposed, as they have a responsibility to help them learn to think critically for themselves. These are affirmative responsibilities, not to be discharged simply by preventing them from reading works for which they are not yet prepared. In these matters values differ, and values cannot be legislated; nor can machinery be devised that will suit the demands of one group without limiting the freedom of others.
     
    5. It is not in the public interest to force a reader to accept with any expression the prejudgment of a label characterizing it or its author as subversive or dangerous.

    The ideal of labeling presupposes the existence of individuals or groups with wisdom to determine by authority what is good or bad for the citizen. It presupposes that individuals must be directed in making up their minds about the ideas they examine. But Americans do not need others to do their thinking for them.

    6. It is the responsibility of publishers and librarians, as guardians of the people's freedom to read, to contest encroachments upon that freedom by individuals or groups seeking to impose their own standards or tastes upon the community at large.

    It is inevitable in the give and take of the democratic process that the political, the moral, or the aesthetic concepts of an individual or group will occasionally collide with those of another individual or group. In a free society individuals are free to determine for themselves what they wish to read, and each group is free to determine what it will recommend to its freely associated members. But no group has the right to take the law into its own hands, and to impose its own concept of politics or morality upon other members of a democratic society. Freedom is no freedom if it is accorded only to the accepted and the inoffensive.

    7. It is the responsibility of publishers and librarians to give full meaning to the freedom to read by providing books that enrich the quality and diversity of thought and expression. By the exercise of this affirmative responsibility, they can demonstrate that the answer to a "bad" book is a good one, the answer to a "bad" idea is a good one.

    The freedom to read is of little consequence when the reader cannot obtain matter fit for that reader's purpose. What is needed is not only the absence of restraint, but the positive provision of opportunity for the people to read the best that has been thought and said. Books are the major channel by which the intellectual inheritance is handed down, and the principal means of its testing and growth. The defense of the freedom to read requires of all publishers and librarians the utmost of their faculties, and deserves of all citizens the fullest of their support.

    We state these propositions neither lightly nor as easy generalizations. We here stake out a lofty claim for the value of the written word. We do so because we believe that it is possessed of enormous variety and usefulness, worthy of cherishing and keeping free. We realize that the application of these propositions may mean the dissemination of ideas and manners of expression that are repugnant to many persons. We do not state these propositions in the comfortable belief that what people read is unimportant. We believe rather that what people read is deeply important; that ideas can be dangerous; but that the suppression of ideas is fatal to a democratic society. Freedom itself is a dangerous way of life, but it is ours.

    This statement was originally issued in May of 1953 by the Westchester Conference of the American Library Association and the American Book Publishers Council, which in 1970 consolidated with the American Educational Publishers Institute to become the Association of American Publishers.
    Adopted June 25, 1953; revised January 28, 1972, January 16, 1991, July 12, 2000, by the ALA Council and the AAP Freedom to Read Committee.
    A Joint Statement by:
    American Library Association and
    Association of American Publishers
    Subsequently Endorsed by:
    American Association of University Professors
    American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression
    American Society of Journalists and Authors
    American Society of Newspaper Editors
    Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith
    Association of American University Presses
    Center for Democracy & Technology
    The Children's Book Council
    The Electronic Frontier Foundation
    Feminists for Free Expression
    Freedom to Read Foundation
    International Reading Association
    The Media Institute
    National Coalition Against Censorship
    National PTA
    Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays
    PEN American Center
    People for the American Way
    Student Press Law Center
    The Thomas Jefferson Center for the Protection of Free Expression

    Appendix C
    THE SCHOOL LIBRARY BILL OF RIGHTS FOR SCHOOL LIBRARY MEDIA PROGRAMS

    The American Association of School Librarians reaffirms its belief in the Library Bill of Rights of the American Library Association. Media personnel are concerned with generating understanding of American freedoms through the development of informed and responsible citizens. To this end, the American Association of School Librarians asserts that the responsibility of the school library media center is:

    To provide a comprehensive collection of instructional materials selected in compliance with basic, written selection principles, and to provide maximum accessibility to these materials.

    To provide materials that will support the curriculum, taking into consideration the individual's needs, and the varied interests, abilities, socio-economic backgrounds, and maturity levels of the students served.

    To provide materials for teachers and students that will encourage growth in knowledge, and that will develop literary, cultural, and aesthetic appreciation and ethical standards.

    To provide materials which reflect the ideas and beliefs of religious, social, political, historical, and ethnic groups and their contribution to the American and world heritage and culture, thereby enabling students to develop integrity in forming judgments.
    To provide a written statement, approved by the local Boards of Education, of the procedures for meeting the challenge of censorship of materials in school library media centers.

    To provide qualified professional personnel to serve teachers and students.
    Adopted by the American Association of School Librarians Board of Directors, Atlantic City, 1969.

    Appendix D
    Electronic Information Policy
    In keeping with our role as a source of information, the library provides Internet access to information beyond the confines of our collection. The Internet affords us an opportunity to have immediate access to timely and comprehensive information as well as a wide variety of primary sources. Providing connections to global information services and networks outside the library is different from selecting and purchasing materials for the library collection. The Internet changes rapidly, frequently, and unpredictably. As the vast amount of information on the Internet is generated outside the library, the library cannot be responsible for accuracy, authenticity, currency, availability, or completeness of information. We cannot insure that Internet communications are secure or private. Because of the library's limitations, the user is responsible for using discretion when considering the quality of material, questioning the validity of information, and choosing what is individually appropriate. In the CDO High School Library setting, the Internet is a resource which provides timely access to students' information needs. Unfortunately, limited computer resources do not permit the library to support all types of Internet and computer usage. Therefore, in order to best allocate these finite resources, student use of the library's computers will be limited in the following ways:� Academic use will always have priority over recreational use.

    � Game playing, email, chat, online shopping, personal "productivity" activities (e.g., word processing, Web page development, etc.) and other inappropriate computer usage as determined by library staff are not permitted. � Printing privileges are restricted to academic use. Exceptions to this policy will be made at the discretion of the librarian.
    Appendix E
    CREW Guidelines for Weeding

    M Misleading (and/or factually inaccurate)
    U Ugly (worn and beyond good mending/rebinding)
    S Superceded (by a truly new edition or by a better book on the subject)
    T Trivial (of no discernible literary/scientific merit)
    I Irrelevant to the needs/interests of community
    E Elsewhere available expeditiously

    3-part Formulas for Crew weeding:

    8/3/MUSTIE=

    Consider a book in this category for discard when latest copyright is more than 8 years old.

    Consider a book in this category for discard when last circulation/inhouse use was more than 3 years ago.

    Age category varies considerably by subject

    Appendix F
    K-1531.1 KEC-E

    PUBLIC CONCERNS / COMPLAINTS ABOUT INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES

    RECONSIDERATION REQUEST FORM

    request for reevaluation of printed or audiovisual material
    Review material in its entirety before completing the following.
    Fill in all applicable information

    Author
    _________________________________________________________________
    Title
    ___________________________________________________________________
    Publisher or producer (if known)
    ________________________________________
    Date of publication or production
    ________________________________________
    Type of material (book, filmstrip, motion picture, etc.)
    ____________________
    Request initiated by
    _____________________________________________________
    Telephone _____________ Address
    ______________________________________
    City ____________________________________________________ Zip
    __________
    School(s) in which the item is used
    ______________________________________
    ________________________________________________________________________
    Person making the request represents
    � him/herself � group or organization
    ________________________ __________________________________________
    Name of Group Address of Group

    1. To what in the item do you object? Please be specific; cite pages or
    frames, etc.)
    ________________________________________________________

    2. In your opinion, what harmful effects upon pupils might result from
    use of this item?
    _____________________________________________________

    3. Do you perceive any instructional value in the use of this item?
    _________

    _____________________________________________________________________

    4. Should the opinion of any additional experts in the field be considered?
    � Yes. Please list suggestions, if any
    _________________________________

    _____________________________________________________________________
    � No.
    In the place of this item, would you care to recommend other material
    you consider to be of equal or superior quality for the purpose intended?

    _____________________________________________________________________

    _____________________________________________________________________

    _____________________________________________________________________

    5. Do you wish to make an oral presentation to the Challenged Materials
    committee?
    � Yes (a) Please call the office of the librarian
    ______________________
    (Telephone Number)
    (b) Please be prepared at this time to indicate the approximate
    length of time your presentation will require.
    � No.
    __________________________________________________________________
    Date Signature
    Adopted: date of manual adoption

    Appendix G
    I-5961.1 IJL-R

    LIBRARY MATERIALS SELECTION AND ADOPTION

    Students should have the opportunity to develop a wide variety of interests and to develop an understanding and appreciation of human achievement in the humanities, fine arts, and sciences. These are two of the educational goals adopted by the Governing Board. The library media center shall be instrumental in the achievement of these goals.

    Objectives of Selection of Materials

    The primary objective of the school's library media center is to implement, enrich, and support the educational program of the school. It is the duty of the center to provide a wide range of materials on all levels of difficulty, with diversity of appeal and the presentation of different points of view.

    To this end, the Governing Board endorses The Students' Right to Read, the Library Bill of Rights, and the School Library Bill of Rights for School Library Media Center Programs, approved by the board of directors of the American Association of School Librarians, Atlantic City, 1969, the last of which is a part of this regulation.

    The American Association of School Librarians reaffirms its belief in the Library Bill of Rights of the American Library Association. Media personnel are concerned with generating understanding of American freedoms through the development of informed and responsible citizens. To this end, the American Association of School Librarians asserts that the responsibility of the school library media center is:

    To provide a comprehensive collection of instructional materials selected in compliance with basic written selection principles and to provide maximum accessibility to these materials.

    To provide materials that will support the curriculum, taking into consideration the individual's needs, and the varied interests, abilities, socioeconomic backgrounds, and maturity levels of the students served.

    To provide materials for teachers and students that will encourage growth in knowledge, and that will develop literary, cultural and aesthetic appreciation, and ethical standards.

    To provide materials that reflect the ideas and beliefs of religious, social, political, historical, and ethnic groups and their contribution to the American and world heritage and culture, thereby enabling students to develop intellectual integrity in forming judgments.

    To provide a written statement, approved by the Governing Board, of the procedures for meeting the challenge of censorship of materials in school library media centers.

    To provide qualified professional personnel to serve teachers and students.

    Materials Defined

    Materials shall include, but not be limited to, books, periodicals, filmstrips, videotapes, computer software, and the like.

    Responsibility for Selection of Materials

    Although the Governing Board is legally responsible for all matters relating to the operation of District schools, the responsibility for the selection of instructional materials is delegated to the professionally trained personnel employed by the school system.

    Selection of materials may involve any or all of the following individuals: principals, teachers, parents, supervisors, and media specialists. The responsibility for coordinating the selection of library and media center materials and making recommendations for purchase rests with the professionally trained media personnel.

    Criteria for Selection of Materials

    Needs of the individual school based on knowledge of the curriculum and of the existing collection are given first consideration.
    Materials for purchase are considered on the basis of:

    Overall purpose; timeliness or permanence; importance of the subject matter; quality of the writing/production; readability and popular appeal; authoritativeness; reputation and significance of the author/ artist/composer/producer, etc.; format and price.

    Requests from faculty and students shall be given consideration.

    Procedures for Selection

    In selecting materials for purchase, the media specialist shall evaluate the existing collection and consult:

    Reputable, unbiased, professionally prepared selection aids; specialists from all departments and/or all grade levels.

    In specific areas, the media specialist shall follow these procedures:

    Gift materials shall be judged by basic selection standards, and shall be accepted or rejected by these standards.

    Multiple items of outstanding and much-in-demand media shall be purchased as needed.

    Worn or missing standard items shall be replaced periodically.

    Out-of-date or no longer useful materials shall be withdrawn from the collection.
     
    Challenged Materials and Committee

    Occasional objections to a selection will be made by the public, despite the care taken to select valuable materials for student and teacher use and the qualifications of persons who select the materials.

    Committee selection. In light of this, a challenged materials committee shall be appointed by the Superintendent annually (within 10 days of the commencement of the school year) and shall consist of three professionally trained media specialists, two heads of high school departments (representing at least one English department), two teachers from different grade levels (primary, intermediate, or middle school), one lay person, and one administrative officer, for a total of nine committee members.
    If a complaint is made, the procedures outlined below shall be followed:

    Be courteous, but make no commitments.

    Invite the complainant to file the objection(s) in writing by filling out the prepared questionnaire. The complainant shall be advised to returnthe questionnaire to either the school librarian or department chairperson, who, in turn, will distribute copies to the building principal, Superintendent, and challenged materials committee chairperson for distribution to committee members within five days of receipt.

    Materials are not to be removed from use until a decision approving such removal has been made by the governing board unless temporary removal has been recommended by the Superintendent or designee.

    If consideration for temporary removal is recommended by the Superintendent or designee, the following procedures shall be followed:

    The Superintendent or designee shall call a special meeting of the challenged materials committee.

    The Superintendent may override the decision of the committee for or against temporary removal of the challenged item.

    If the decision reached is for temporary removal of the item, the item shall be removed pending committee action.

    If temporary removal is not considered, the item shall be retained subject to committee action.

    The challenged materials committee shall:

    Read and/or view and examine material referred to it.

    Check general acceptance of the material by reading reviews and soliciting opinions from others competent in the field concerned.

    Weigh values and faults against each other and form opinions based on the material as a whole and not on passages pulled out of context.

    Meet within 60 workdays of receipt of the complaint to determine whether the material meets the objectives of selection.

    A quorum of the Challenged Materials Committee shall consist of five members.

    In the event of a decision by the committee to remove the material permanently from circulation, a two-thirds vote for removal by a quorum must be reached. The Superintendent may not override a two-thirds vote of a quorum.

    A majority vote must be reached in deciding whether the material shall remain in unlimited circulation and/or be placed in restricted circulation.

    Within 30 days of that meeting, the committee chairperson will forward copies of the report to the Superintendent, the principal, the media specialist or department chairperson who received the complaint, and the complainant.

    The report will indicate the recommendation of the committee as to whether the material will remain in circulation, be placed on restricted circulation, or be withdrawn permanently from circulation and the reasons for its decision.

    Upon review of the committee's report, and within 10 workdays of receipt, the Superintendent or designee shall either confirm the recommendation or refer the report back to the committee for further study and a subsequent report.

    If the Superintendent confirms a recommendation to have the material permanently removed from the schools of the District, a recommendation for action will be made to the Governing Board.

    The complainant, committee members, school principals, department chairpersons, and media specialists shall be advised of the action of the Governing Board.

    Record of the disposition of the complaint will be retained by the District.

    Appeal of Decision

    The complainant shall be advised that an appeal may be made to the Governing Board in writing within 10 days of receipt of the decision. The Governing Board will review the materials and within 30 days render its final decision.

    Adopted: date of manual adoption
    Appendix H
    I-6200 IJNC
    RESOURCE CENTERS / MEDIA CENTERS / SCHOOL LIBRARIES

    The Governing Board recognizes the importance of an adequately staffed,
    well-equipped, and well-furnished library media center in each school for
    the achievement of quality education. In implementing this concept, the
    Governing Board shall make every effort, within the financial resources of
    the District, to provide such library media centers in the District schools.

    The Governing Board accepts and adopts the philosophy expressed by the
    National Council of Teachers of English regarding the students' right to
    read, as follows:

    The right to read, like all rights embedded in our constitutional
    traditions, can be used wisely or foolishly. In many ways education is
    an effort to improve the quality of the choices which are the exercise
    of this right. For this reason, we respect the right of individuals to be
    selective in their own reading and of individuals and groups to
    express their views for the guidance of others. But for the same
    reason, we oppose efforts by individuals or groups to limit the
    freedom of choice of others or to impose their own standards or tests
    upon a community at large. [National Council of Teachers of
    English. The Students' Right to Read. Champaign, Ill.: the Council,
    1962. p.8]

    Adopted: date of manual adoption

    LEGAL REF.: A.R.S. 15-341(A)(4)
    15-362
    41-1354

    I-6211 IJNC-RA

    RESOURCE CENTERS / MEDIA CENTERS / SCHOOL LIBRARIES

    (INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES FOR STUDENTS)

    The Governing Board recognizes the students' needs for a variety of
    instructional resources to accomplish the goals and objectives of curriculum
    and instruction adopted by the Board.

    Instructional resources to meet the needs of the students shall include, but
    are not limited to, books, films, film strips, television programs, pamphlets,
    brochures, magazines, posters, pictures, computer software and hardware,
    demonstrations, and guest speakers.

    Adopted: date of manual adoption

    I-6212 IJNC-RB

    RESOURCE CENTERS / MEDIA CENTERS / SCHOOL LIBRARIES

    (INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES FOR TEACHERS)

    Audiovisual Materials

    At the beginning of each school year, every teacher shall be provided with a
    catalog of audiovisual materials, including films, film strips, and other
    audiovisual material and services available from the District materials
    center. The materials center shall be responsible for preparing and
    distributing the catalogs.

    Principals shall be responsible for organizing the requisitioning and use of
    audiovisual materials at each of the schools so as to achieve effective
    utilization and safekeeping of such resources.

    Adopted: date of manual adoption

    I-6311 IJND-R

    TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES

    (Movies/Videos/Software Programs)

    In elementary schools, teachers must notify parents in advance when they
    plan to show movies/videos with a rating of PG. Form IJND-E must be
    completed by the teacher and used to inform parents of the proposed
    viewing. Movies/videos with ratings above PG (PG-13, R, or NC-17) are not
    to be shown. This includes movies/videos shown in the classroom or any
    District facility (this includes buses and motels where students are present).
    Parents have the right to deny permission for their children to view a
    particular movie/video (see permission on form IJND-E).

    In middle schools, teachers must notify parents in advance when they plan
    to show movies/videos with a rating of PG-13. Form IJND-E must be
    completed by the teacher and used to inform parents of the proposed
    viewing. Movies/videos with ratings above PG-13 (R and NC-17) are not to
    be shown. This includes movies/videos shown in the classroom or any
    District facility (this includes buses and motels where students are present).
    Parents have the right to deny permission for their children to view a
    particular movie/video (see permission on form IJND-E).
     
    In high schools, teachers must notify parents in advance when they plan to
    show movies/videos with a rating of R. Form IJND-E must be completed by
    the teacher and used to inform parents of the proposed viewing.
    Movies/videos with ratings above R (NC-17) are not to be shown. This
    includes movies/videos shown in the classroom or any District facility (this
    includes buses and motels where students are present). Parents have the
    right to deny permission for their children to view a particular movie/video
    (see permission on form IJND-E).

    Use of Media in Schools

    It is the responsibility of Amphitheater Public Schools employees to use
    sound professional judgment in the selection of media to be used with
    students. With regard to the use of video/films and computer software, the
    following issues must be considered:

    General Guidelines

    Every video, film, and computer software program used in a school
    must be used to add value to the instructional program; there shall be
    specific rationale designating the selection's instructional benefits.
    Instructional media selected primarily for recreation as rewards, etc.,
    shall be limited in frequency. Use of copyrighted media rented or
    purchased for private home use is prohibited, except for limited excerpts
    allowed by "The Fair Use Doctrine".

    If a video, film, and computer software program selected to be shown
    in school has potential for controversy or contains any element listed on
    form IJND-E (on file in the principal's office), then form IJND-E shall be
    completed and sent to parents to obtain approval in writing for their
    child to view it.

    School personnel must preview all media before showing to students.

    The use of television programming, other than for specific
    instructional purposes, is inappropriate. Having televisions tuned to
    broadcasts of general programming while students are working
    independently is an unacceptable practice, which diminishes quality
    work habits. Live broadcasts of historical events including live speeches,
    space exploration, or state funerals are permissible.

    Age appropriateness. The content of any media shall be selected with the
    age and maturity of the students in mind.

    The copyright law. Employees of the school system are expected to
    adhere to the provisions of the copyright law. School system personnel shall
    be aware of and must abide by the following guidelines/rules:

    Showing videos/films in schools are recognized as public
    performances. The legal definition of a public performance is "a place
    open to the public...where...people outside the normal circle of family and
    its social acquaintances are gathered". Only the copyright holder has the
    right to authorize a public performance.

    It is illegal for District personnel to rent or purchase videos produced
    for home use and show them exclusively for reward or recreational
    purposes. Use of videos/films produced for home use must be based on
    specific rationale designating the selection's instructional benefits, and
    only the excerpts required for the instructional purpose may be used
    under "The Fair Use Doctrine".

    Videos, films, and computer software used in schools must be
    obtained through authorized educational producers and/or distributors
    that provide public performance rights within the purchase and/or rental
    price.

    Adopted: date of manual adoption
    Revised: April 24, 2001
    I-6331 IJND-E

    TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES

    (Movies/Videos)

    TEACHER REQUEST/PERMISSION FORM
    FOR MOVIE/VIDEO USE

    Date of Request: _____________________________________________________
    Teacher and School: __________________________________________________
    Course Title and/or Grade: ____________________________________________
    Movie/Video Title: ___________________________________________________

    Movie/Video Rating (circle one): G PG PG-13 R NR-(not rated)

    Amount of the movie/video to be shown (minutes):
    ________________________

    Proposed date(s) of viewing:
    ____________________________________________
    The Amphitheater Public Schools recognize that film/video shall only be
    used to enhance instruction. Please explain why you believe that this
    film/video excerpt is essential to your course/unit of study (continue on an
    attached sheet of paper if necessary).



    Excerpt contains (check all that apply):

    o None of the following o Adult language o Human sexual behavior
    o Violence o Graphic content o Illicit drug or alcohol use

    What alternative arrangement/assignment do you propose for a student
    whose parent does not give permission for his/her child's viewing of this
    movie/video? (Continue on an attached sheet of paper if necessary).



    Denied _________ Approved _________

    _________________________ _________________________ Date
    _________

    Teacher Signature Administrator Signature
    Parental Response:

    o I give my permission for my student to view the
    movie/video described above.

    o I do not give my permission for my student to view the
    movie/video described above.

    __________________________________
    _________________________________

    Student Name (please print) Parent Signature

    05/11/01

    Appendix I
    A copy of the Amphitheater Research Paper Project Writing Assessment may be viewed in the CDO Library.
    Appendix J
    The Nine Information Literacy Standards for Student Learning

    Information Literacy
    Standard 1: The student who is information literate accesses information efficiently and effectively.
    Standard 2: The student who is information literate evaluates information critically and competently.
    Standard 3: The student who is information literate uses information accurately and creatively.

    Independent Learning
    Standard 4: The student who is an independent learner is information literate and pursues information related to personal interests.
    Standard 5: The student who is an independent learner is information literate and appreciates literature and other creative expressions of information.
    Standard 6: The student who is an independent learner is information literate and strives for excellence in information seeking and knowledge generation.

    Social Responsibility
    Standard 7: The student who contributes positively to the learning community and to society is information literate and recognizes the importance of information in a democratic society.
    Standard 8: The student who contributes positively to the learning community and to society is information literate and practices ethical behavior in regard to information and information technology.
    Standard 9: The student who contributes positively to the learning community and to society is information literate and participates effectively in groups to pursue and generate information.

     
    Appendix L
    Amphitheater Unified School District
    Amphitheater Information Services
    Electronic User Agreement
    Acceptable Uses
    I understand and agree as follows:
    The Amphitheater Unified School District provides students and employees with access to information systems and educational technology resources consisting of: stand-alone computers and peripheral equipment, computer workstations connected to local area networks, server and networked peripheral equipment, a wide area network which includes access to the Internet, voice communication system, and electronic communication systems which include audio and video capability. The Amphitheater Information Services (AIS) System may only be used for educational purposes. The term "educational purposes" includes classroom activities, career or professional development, limited high-quality personal research and other work related purposes. I may not use the system for entertainment purposes, commercial purposes or political lobbying. I am expected to follow the rules set forth in the District's disciplinary code and the law. In addition to this Agreement, my use of the AIS System is governed by Governing Board Policy IJNDB copies of which are available at each school office.
    The AIS System has not been established as a public access service or a public forum. Therefore, the District has the right to place reasonable restrictions on the material accessed or posted through the system. I am expected to follow the rules set forth in the District's Policies and Administrative Regulations and the law. I realize that information accessed, created, sent, received or stored on the network is not private. It is subject to review by network system administrators and system administrators may investigate complaints regarding inappropriate or illegal material.
    Unacceptable Uses. To prevent against unacceptable use of the AIS System, I understand and agree as follows:
    1) Personal safety or the safety of others. (Applicable to students only.)
    a) I will not post personal contact information about myself or others (i.e. names, addresses, telephone numbers, school address, etc.) unless I have prior written permission from my teacher and/or parent to do so.
    b) I will not meet with someone I meet online without my parent's approval and involvement.
    c) I will promptly tell my teacher or school principal if I receive any message that is inappropriate or makes me feel uncomfortable.
    2) Illegal Activities.
    a) I will not attempt to gain unauthorized access to the AIS System or any other computer system through the AIS System or go beyond my authorized access. I will not attempt to log in through another person's account or access their files without their express written permission.
    b) I will not attempt to disrupt the AIS System or destroy data by spreading viruses or by any other means.
    c) I will not use the AIS System to engage in any other illegal or inappropriate acts (drug or alcohol purchase, distribution or sale, criminal gang activity, threatening conduct, etc.).
    3) Plagiarism and Copyright Infringement.
    a) I will not plagiarize works I find on the Internet. Plagiarism is taking the ideas or writing of others and presenting them as if they were mine.
    b) I will respect the rights of copyright owners. Copyright infringement would occur if I inappropriately reproduce a work that is protected by a copyright. If a work contains language that specifies appropriate uses of that work, I will follow those requirements. If I am unsure of whether I may use a work, I will request permission from the copyright owner. I will ask a teacher or AIS System administrator if I have questions.
    4) Language.
    a) I will not use obscene, lewd, vulgar, rude, inflammatory, threatening or disrespectful language.
    b) I will not post information that could cause damage or danger of disruption to the educational environment or operations of the District.
    c) I will not engage in personal attacks, including prejudicial or discriminatory attacks on individuals or groups. I will not harass others. Harassment is persistently acting in a manner that distresses or annoys another person. If I am told by someone to stop sending them messages, I will immediately stop.
    d) I will not knowingly or recklessly post false or defamatory information about a person or organization.
    e) I will not post chain letters or engage in "spamming" (sending unnecessary messages to a large number of people).
    5) System security.
    a) I am responsible for my email and/or network account. I will not provide my password to another person or use another person's password unless I have obtained prior written permission to do so from my teacher (for a student) or an AIS System administrator (for an employee).
    b) I will not permit another person to use my account or use another person's account unless I have obtained prior written permission to do so from my teacher (for a student) and an AIS System administrator (for an employee).
    c) I will immediately notify my teacher or the AIS System administrator if I have identified a possible security problem.
    d) I will not download software or load software on the network or hard drive of any computer in a manner inconsistent with the district's Software Specifications without written authorization from the AIS Administrator to do so. The Software Specifications can be found at https://www.amphi.com/~technology/software.htm.
    e) I will follow the virus protection precautions when downloading software that I have been given prior written permission to download, to protect against the inadvertent spread of computer viruses. For security information, refer to https://www.amphi.com/~technology /security/index.htm.
    f) I will not attempt to harm or destroy data of another user or any other agencies or networks connected to the AIS System. This includes, but is not limited to, uploading or creating computer viruses.
    g) I will not move, harm, destroy or deface any District owned hardware.
     
    Amphitheater Unified School District

    Amphitheater Information Services

    Electronic User Agreement



    h) I will not attempt to repair District owned Technology Resources without prior written approval. All requests for repair or service will be channeled through the Department of Instructional Technology Hotline.

    i) I will have all portable information systems and educational technology resources assigned to me (such as notebook computers and peripheral or companion devices) at allocated sites during school hours unless prior written approval has been received.

    j) I will notify an AIS system administrator if a password is lost or stolen, or if there is a reason to believe that someone has obtained unauthorized access to the system.

    k) I will not attempt to use any personal electronic devices (i.e. PDAs, Blackberries, cell phones, etc.) to disrupt or damage our network services.

    l) Wireless networks will not be permitted without the express written authorization of the AIS System administrator.



    6) Inappropriate Transmission Of And Access To Material.

    a) I will not transmit or access material that is profane or obscene (i.e. pornography), that advocates illegal acts, or that advocates violence or discrimination towards others (i.e. hate literature). A special exception may be made for teachers or high school students who wish to access hate literature if the purpose of the access is to conduct research. In this situation, a student must obtain both teacher and parental written consent.

    b) If I mistakenly access inappropriate information, I will immediately tell a teacher (for a student) or my supervisor (for an employee) so they know I did not intentionally access the information.

    c) I will transmit communications using only District approved and District managed communication systems. I will not use free, web-based mail, instant messaging, video conferencing or chat services which are not permitted on school networks unless expressly authorized.

    d) The development and posting of all web pages must be in a manner specified by the District's Department of Informational Technology. Material placed on web pages must relate to school and career preparation activities and be used to inform, communicate, and educate.

    e) I understand that many services are available for a fee and I know that I am responsible for paying for those services, if used.

    7) General Network Etiquette.

    a) I will be brief. Few people will bother to read a long message.

    b) I will minimize spelling errors and make sure my message is easy to understand and read.

    c) I will use accurate and descriptive titles in my communications, so people will know what it is about before they read it.

    d) I will address the most appropriate audience for my message, not the widest.

    e) I will remember that humor and satire is very often misinterpreted.

    f) I will remember that if I post to multiple groups, I will specify all groups in a single message.

    g) I will cite references for any facts that I present.

    h) I will not attack correspondents; I will persuade them with facts.

    i) I will exercise good judgment and care to ensure that I do not use the AIS system in a manner that will embarrass, hurt or harm others.

    My Rights.

    I understand that the District may restrict my speech for valid educational or business reasons. I understand and agree that:

    1) My use of the district�s AIS System is not private. My parents can request to see the contents of my E-mail files at any time (applies to students under 18 years).

    2) Routine maintenance and monitoring of the AIS System may lead to discovery that I have violated District Policies, Administrative Regulations, this Agreement or the law.

    3) An individual search will be conducted if there is a reasonable suspicion that I have violated this Agreement, District Policy, Administrative Regulation or the law. The investigation will be reasonable and related to the suspected violation.

    4) The District will cooperate fully with local, state or federal officials in any investigation related to any illegal activities conducted using the AIS System.

    5) If I am alleged to have violated this Agreement, District Policy IJNDB or the law in my use of the AIS System, I will be provided with notice of the suspected violation and an opportunity to present an explanation of what occurred. If the alleged violation also involves a violation of other provisions of the District's disciplinary code, it will be handled in a manner described in the disciplinary code.

    6) The District reserves the right to restrict or revoke my use of the AIS System at any time, if deemed within the District's best interest.

    Disclaimer Of Liability.

    The District makes no warranties of any kind, expressed or implied, for the services provided. The District shall not be liable for damages I suffer caused by my inappropriate use of the AIS system, copyright violations, mistakes or negligence. The District shall not be responsible for any costs I incur without the District's prior written permission. The District shall not be responsible for ensuring the accuracy or usability of any information found on the Internet. The District shall not be responsible for any damages I suffer while using its AIS system, such as loss of data, malfunctions, delays, non-deliveries, misdeliveries or service interruptions caused by the service or by my errors or omissions. Use of any information obtained via the information service is at my own risk. Parents, adult students and employees can be held financially responsible for any harm to the system as a result of intentional misuse.



     
    Amphitheater Unified School District

    Amphitheater Information Services

    Electronic User Agreement



    This Agreement must Be Signed Before the Student May Receive an Access Account.

    When Signed, it Becomes a Legally Binding Contract.

    Student Section:



    Student Name:

    Grade:


    School:

    Birth Date:


    Student ID:





    I have read and received a copy of the District's User Agreement and agree to abide by it. I understand that if I violate the terms and conditions, my account can be terminated and I may face other disciplinary and/or legal consequences.



    Student Signature:

    Date:





    Parent or Guardian Section (must be signed if student is under 18 years of age):

    I have read the District's User Agreement and have discussed it with my child. I give the District permission to issue an account for my child and for my child to use the AIS System.

    I release the District and its personnel from any and all claims and damages of any nature arising from my child's use of, or inability to use, the AIS System, including but not limited to, claims that may arise from the unauthorized use of the system to purchase products or services.

    I have instructed my child regarding any restrictions I wish to impose against accessing materials that are in addition to the restrictions set forth in the District's User Agreement. I have emphasized to my child the importance of following the rules for personal safety. I accept full responsibility for supervision if and when my child's use of the AIS System is not in a school setting.

    I understand that the information service may occasionally require new registration and account information for my child to continue the service. I will notify the Teacher or Director of Technology Services of any changes in his/her account information.



    I (Do_______, Do Not_______) authorize my child to use the Internet.



    I (Do_______, Do Not_______) authorize the release of my child's picture to be used on district web pages.



    I (Do_______, Do Not_______) authorize the release of my child's intellectual property such as artwork, poetry, essays, performances, etc. to be used on district web pages.



    Parent/Guardian Name (Print)




    Parent/Guardian Signature:

    Date:








    Sponsoring Teacher (Must be signed if the applicant is a student.)



    I have read the AIS Electronic User Agreement and agree to promote this agreement with the student. Because the student may use the network for individual work or in the context of another class, I cannot be held responsible for the student use of the network. As the sponsoring teacher I do agree to instruct the student use of the network and proper network etiquette.

    Teacher Name (Print)




    Teacher Signature:

    Date:









    Appendix M
    E-3911.1 EGAD-R

    COPYRIGHT COMPLIANCE

    The District and its employees shall comply with all copyright laws, and the
    District shall make available the following data to aid the school staff in said
    compliance.

    Copyright Handbook

    The Arizona Department of Education has prepared a copyright handbook,
    which consists of the following main parts:

    A detailed summary and discussion of portions of the law.

    An appendix with guidelines for:

    Reproduction,

    Recommended warnings and notices,

    Suggested forms,

    A checklist of permitted, prohibited, and questionable uses of
    copyrighted works.

    These guidelines have been written primarily for use by the educational
    community and incorporate the most important portions of the copyright
    laws so that infringements can be reduced. Legal advisors were consulted
    during the preparation of these guidelines and, where the law was unclear,
    there is a check mark in the "Not Sure" column.

    Handbook Location

    The Arizona Department of Education copyright handbook is available in
    every building within the District.

    The entire Copyright Law of 1976 can be found in any law library and most
    public libraries as Title 17 of the United States Code. A copy may also be
    obtained from the Register of Copyrights, Library of Congress, Washington,
    D.C. 20559.

    School administrators will make available a copy of the guidelines provided
    by the Arizona Department of Education, and may post pertinent data in an
    appropriate area within the school site.

    Publication or Creation of Materials

    In the event of development of products, the following procedures shall be
    followed:

    The employee(s) shall file a notice of intent to publish or
    manufacture with the person to whom the employee(s) is
    administratively responsible.

    The supervisor shall then prepare a report containing the following
    information:

    Description of the product.

    The name of the person(s) involved in creating the product.

    The percentage of duty time, if any, of the person's normal job
    responsibility that was devoted to creating the product.

    The report shall then be filed with the office of the Superintendent.

    The Superintendent shall thereupon appoint a committee of three
    persons having knowledge of the product (excluding those involved in
    creating it).

    The committee shall review the report and make a recommendation
    to the Superintendent for action.

    Prior to making a decision, the Superintendent will confer with the
    person(s) eligible to receive royalties to help assure a mutually
    satisfactory arrangement.

    Should any employee(s) involved be dissatisfied with a decision so
    made by the Superintendent, appeal may be taken to the Governing
    Board.

    Adopted: date of manual adoption